Judge rules Taylor Swift lyrics are too basic to copyright

Taylor Swift has dodged a lawsuit this week because her lyrics are too “banal.”

In case you're unfamiliar with that word (it's not exactly something used every day, is it?), it means: "so lacking in originality as to be obvious and boring."

Lol! Harsh :|

Last year the songwriters behind the 2001 hit “Playas Gon’ Play” sued Taylor Swift because the lyrics in her song “Shake It Off” closely resembled theirs. This week, a judge has offered a ruling on the matter. And he burned her good.

Sean Hall and Nathan Butler claimed copyright infringement over the use of the phrase, “The players gonna play, play, play, play, and the haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate,” in Swift’s 2014 chart topper, claiming it directly referenced lyrics they’d already written. In the 3LW's chorus, the women sing “Playas they gonna play, and haters they gonna hate.” 

According to the Copyright Act, a song is protected if the music or lyrics surpass what the court deems “the banal or trivial.” So art needs some specific signature in order to be copyright-able. Clichés and common phrases tend to not fall under this protection, since they usually lack the specificity needed to prove an original idea.

So basically it's not unique enough to bother suing over. Lol!